Inspiraciencia awards ceremony

On Tuesday, April 30, at the Sagrada Familia’s Library, La Mandarina de Newton was at the awards ceremony of the III Scientific Writing Contest – Inspiraciencia, organized by CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas), with the support of the FECYT and the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness.

La Mandarina de Newton participated as part of the event’s organization and also presented the contemporary dance piece ‘Transposicionals’, co-directed with Big Bouncers.

Inspiraciencia is a project of the Unit of Scientific Culture of the CSIC Delegation in Catalonia and the Institute of Science Materials of Barcelona (CSIC). It is a scientific writing contest opened to anyone interested in imagining Science through Literature. Participants can submit short stories or micro-stories in Catalan, Spanish or Galician, within one of the two contest categories, general public (over 18) or young public (under 18). The winners are selected by an official jury and by the public, which can vote on-line for the best text of each category, regardless of the language.

The third edition of Inspiraciencia count on the participation of more than 500 works. The 15 winning and 13 finalists texts were awarded at the event of this year. The ceremony was attended by Lluís Calvo (Institutional Coordinator CSIC in Catalonia) and Jordi Muñoz (Writing School of the Ateneu Barcelonès), and also by the partners of Inspiraciencia and the participants of the contest.


The ceremony ended with the dance performance, ‘Transposicionals’.

With this performance we wanted to offer the public the opportunity to experience a different way of interpreting and communicating science. Art and Dance were the ‘tools’ we chose for this night. As we referred in the previous post, the show is an improvisation performance of dance, inspired by fragments of some of the stories of this year’s edition of Inspiraciencia. The dancers movements play with the scientific concepts of each of the texts, which are projected on stage as part of the show.




You can check all the photos of the ceremony at our Facebook page.

You can also watch the event summary video we produced:

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Science of the City in Menorca


During this weekend, from thursday 16th to saturday 18th of May, La Mandarina de Newton will be in Menorca to present Science of the City’s project. These days, at the Institut Menorquí d’Estudis (IME) in Mahon, it will take place the 7th European Spring School on History of Science and Popularization, this year dedicated to the topic ‘Science on Television’.

During this edition, students, scholars, researchers and professionals will have the opportunity to discuss the roles Television and Science play in our daily lives. Irene Lapuente (La Mandarina de Newton) will be participating in the conference and will present the project Science of the City on the last day of the event. Some of the videos from the first and second edition will be shown to the participants.

We will keep you updated!

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Investigating the importance of colors

As you know, we continue working on the project Science of the City #2. Although the first phase of the video contest finished early this year, we are still receiving videos as a result of different collaborations we have established with international institutions, in countries such as Croatia or Netherlands. Moreover, we began with the second phase of the project, in which we aim to establish a bridge between participants and scientists.

On Friday April 5, we were at the Institut Lluís de Requesens, Molins de Rei, Barcelona, holding a workshop for students and researchers. The students from this school participated in the 2nd edition of Science of the City video contest with several videos: ‘Temperature Changes‘, ‘A Flood of Signals‘, ‘Public Services at Molins‘ and ‘Boredom at the Institute‘. The lattest was one of the winners of this edition, in which the students questioned the importance of building design in schools, particularly of the colors used in classrooms and corridors, and how this influences the attention span of the students during the classes. This seemed to us an extremely interesting question and thus, with the help of the Atelier des Jours à Venir, we tried to contact experts on perception and cognition.

Two researchers from the Donders Institute (Nilmegen, Netherlands), Dr. Guillaume Sescousse (Cognitive Control- Perception, Action and Control) and Dra. Mathilde Bonnefond (Neuronal Oscillations- Brain Networks and Neuronal Communication) accepted our invitation and came to Molins de Rei to join the workshop.

In this first session we wanted to, in one hand, create a link between the students and the researchers and, on the other hand, find ways to translate the scientific concepts of the winning video to questions that could be interesting for our invited researchers to follow up at their labs. For that we conducted several activities focused on the topics of learning, attention, color,…

We began with a first exercise in order to ‘break the ice’ within the room: we arranged ourselves according to the color of our eyes, from the lightest to the ones darkest. Then, we asked the students to, in post-its of different colors, write down whatever these colors remind them of: peace, joy, euphoria,… Then, the task was to sort the post-its by topics. Once re-ordered, we could conclude that unconsciously we associate different colors with specific issues or feelings.

The students explained what had motivated them to make the video, and the scientists, their research projects

The students hypothesized that the boring environment of the corridors and classrooms of their school could be one of the reasons for the lack of interest and attention during classes. The neuroscientist Guillaume Sescousse explained how he and his team study the reward processing and risky decision-making, in both healthy and psychiatric disorders’ conditions. Dra. Mathilde Bonnefond explained that part of her work in the lab focus on trying to understand how our brain processes the information and how the different brain regions communicate with each other during the different cognitive processes, such as during visual processing under various levels of attention. To illustrate how the colors can interfere with the learning processes and with our ability to maintain our focus levels, the researchers challenged the students with different exercises. One of them was to try to memorize the maximum number of words during 2 minutes. Each set of words was presented in different background colors: red, blue and gray. At the end of the game, we all could confirm that, as shown in scientific studies, the colors influence our memory and focus capabilities. The red creates tension and make us more focused, opposite to blue, which relaxes us. We usually associate blue colors with creative environments, however, this means a reduced ability to retain information.

At the end of the workshop, we asked the students to re-think the questions and ideas raised in the winning video. We wanted to finish the session with a narrow set of questions on the topic. Here are some of the issues raised: Do colors equally affect people of different ages? Does the way we perceive colors depend on the time of the day or season? Does color affects differently people of different cultures? What colors should be chosen for the different school spaces? What happens in the brain during color perception?


Now, of all the questions and issues raised during this morning, students have to choose one, the one they would like to explore with the help of the researchers. The next workshop is already scheduled: on July we all meet again! We will keep you informed!

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'Transposicionals' - dance, science and writing

On Tuesday April 30, 7 p.m. at the Sagrada Família’s Library, La Mandarina de Newton and the group of dancers Big Bouncers will present the contemporary dance piece ‘Transposicionals’, at the awards ceremony of the third edition of Inspiraciencia (Scientific Writing Contest), organized by CSIC and the support of FECYT. This is a dance performance co-directed by La Mandarina de Newton and Big Bouncers.

The performance is inspired by fragments of seven of the texts that participated in the contest. These are stories that explore concepts such as cloning, robotics, quantum mechanics, infinite, relativity, gravity and vacuum. The show that we will be presenting on the 30th, will be an improvisation performance of dance accompanied by an audiovisual work with the texts. The movements will play with the scientific concepts of the Inspiraciencia texts. We would like to offer to the audience a new experience, a different way of communicating science: through art and dance.

Do not miss it!

When: Tuesday April 30, 7 p.m.

Where: Auditorium of Sagrada Família’s Library.

Free activity, limited places

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New videos at our Science of the City platform

There are two new entries on our Science of the City #2 platform. The videos are the result of the workshop we held last March in Amsterdam, in collaboration with the Atelier des Jours à Venir and New Urban Collective. As we mentioned in previous posts, this workshop took place in Bijlmer, Amsterdam, with the aim of encouraging kids to question and explore the science behind their urban daily life. During these two months ‘post-workshop’, the students have been working on their ideas and proposals and the end result are these two videos: one, in which they question the quality of the water: Can we infer the quality of the water by its color?, and other, in which they explore the properties of the butane gas: Why is gas invisible?. – By now you can see the original videos, in Dutch; soon the subtitles will be also available.

   

Next April 19, these videos will be exhibited at the Amsterdam Science & Film Festival, at the Nemo Museum.

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Science of the City at the Amsterdam Science & Film Festival

The third edition of the Amsterdam Science & Film Festival will take place during the 18t, 19 and 20 of April. Over thirty scientific videos under the theme ‘Cities of the Future’ will be exhibited in four iconic institutions of Amsterdam: EYE Film Institute, Filmacademie, Nemo Museum and the Institut Français / Maison Descartes. Apart from the video screening, the public will have also the opportunity to participate in workshops and roundtables. The videos will enter in a competition and the last day of the festival the winners of the two categories ‘Grand Prix’ and ‘New Talent Award’ will be announced. Here you can check the full program of the Festival.

La Mandarina de Newton will be also present at this festival! The Science of the City videos produced by the Bijlmer children that participated in the workshop we organized in March, will be exhibited at the Nemo Museum on the 19th. As you might recall, this workshop was organized in collaboration with the Atelier des Jours à Venir and the New Urban Collective with the aim to motivate the kids to question and explore the science hidden in streets of Amsterdam.

We are eager to see the final result of the workshop during the Festival!

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La Mandarina de Newton in the Netherlands

During the first weekend of March, Irene Lapuente (La Mandarina de Newton) travelled to the Netherlands, to Leiden and Amsterdam. This tryp was done thanks to the collaboration with the Atelier des Jours à Venir and the support of Fondation de France.

On March 1st, Irene was at the Faculty of Sciences, Leiden University, to give a talk about science communication models: ‘Beyond the Science Communication Model: Hybridization, Participation and Activism’. Irene was invited to participate in the Leiden Science Communication Seminars, a monthly series of seminars to discuss contemporary issues in science communication. She presented the ‘recipe’ we use and that she believes should be used to communicate Science: a transdiciplinary and participatory model. A model where communicating is much more than just a passive transfer of information: we hybridize disciplines, knowledge, and ways of thinking and working; we believe in a true dialogue and we avoid the monologue. As an example of this way of working, Irene explained the idea behind our project ‘Science of the City’. As you know, this is a project in which we mix different disciplines (science, urbanism, design, audiovisuals, arts…) and in which we have active participation at different levels. At the end of the talk we were quite happy with the feedback and the discussion generated within the audience. You can check the full presentation here:

The day after, March 2nd, Irene, Livio Riboli-Sasco and Leïla Perié had another appointment, now, in Amsterdam. They presented the concepts behind the project ‘Science of the City’ and lead a workshop for children. The aim was to motivate the kids to question and explore the science hidden in their city. The workshop started with a first challenge: the kids had to invent conversations based on questioning. Then, we performed an interesting exercise: with their questions, they had to change the interrogative words (why/what/how/when/where…) and reflect on how this would change the meaning of the questions and therefore, the answers. We also challenged them to question the science behind a series of pictures we distributed among them. Then, it arrived the most fun part for them: they had to explore their own city. They became little scientists and came up with the questions they would like to answer.

   

They took their own photos and their own notes, like a ‘field’ explorer! And they actually came back with a lot of interesting questions and ideas. After this, it was time, within each group, to choose which of the questions they would like to work on and to make the storyboard of their own ‘Science of the City’ video. The workshop finished here, but this was not the whole story! The students will keep working on their projects. The final goal is to produce some videos and to exhibit them at the Science Center of Amsterdam, the Nemo Museum, during the Fim & Science Festival in April. We will keep you updated!!

You can find all the photos of the workshop in the Science of the City Facebook page.

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Critical Design Cycle: summary of First Participative Workshop about Internal Contamination

Last Friday (March 1, 2013) at the Mandarina Space, we had our first participatory workshop to give shape to the participants’ ideas about Internal Contamination. As you know, this topic was presented by Dr. Miquel Porta (18/01/2013), an internationally recognized researcher and an expert on the field and after his presentation a first debate took place. The goal of friday’s session was to begin a process of critical and speculative design around the concepts and ideas that popped up during that talk.

The workshop, led by Ramon Sagüensa (La Mandarina de Newton), began with an inspiration exercise for the participants. We challenged each of them individually to complete the question ‘What if …?’ with ideas, questions or concerns that came to their minds, related with the topic Internal Contamination. They had to reflect on the positive and negative aspects of it. In just 10 minutes many ideas were generated: What if we changed our lifestyle (if we stop eating meat, if we abandon the urban lifestyle), What if we could measure in detail our internal contamination levels, or the levels of toxics in the products we consume?, What if we could eliminate the toxics of our body, if we could recycle or metabolize them?, What would happen if there existed a region in the world without contamination?, What if contamination were something good for our health, if it could expand our live expectancy? What if internal contamination levels were visible? … and much more!

   

This individual exercise was the starting point for the actual teamwork. Now, participants discussed together these ideas and the dilemmas created by their interplay. For that, they stuck the post-its on a panel and, with the participation of all, reorganized them by topics or concepts. Eventually, an agreement was reached and several clusters of ideas emerge: food, communication and information, utopia, methodology, and disposal of PTCs (persistent toxic compounds). From here, each participant chose the topic that found most interesting and in this way the working groups were formed (four in total).

Then, we started the ideation phase. In each group, participants discussed and identified the ideas they wanted to explore. With the working ideas defined, the participants began to give shape to their proposals and build their ‘prototypes’.

   

The first group, who had chosen the topic ‘Food’, devised ‘The BNQ – The Body Whitening’. They proposed a treatment to ‘withen’ the body internally. With an amazing pill one would be able to clean the body from internal contaminants and this would be reflected in one’s outward beauty: ‘Clean on the inside, beautiful on the outside’.

The second group, based on the topic ‘utopia’, proposed a comics/animation campaign – ‘PTCs Superpowers’ – in which the stories would revolve around a family of characters who had superpowers due to the accumulation of PTCs in their bodies. The third group, who chose the theme ‘elimination of PTCs’ created ‘Sintox’: a set of pills developed by a pharmaceutical company (‘Mandarinartis’) and marketed to a fairly high cost, but that would be able to eliminate completely all your internal toxics. Finally, the fourth group, inspired by the topics ‘information and communication’ and ‘methodology’, proposed a next generation device, the ‘Anxiety Machine’. This product would be comprised of a pill with a PTCs’ sensor that you would swallow. Travelling through your body it would detect your internal levels of PTCs and transmit that information to a square-shaped personal and portable device.

This device would then show the toxic results, identify the most likely diseases that one would develop as a consequence of the level and type of contamination, and it would also offer an option to share the results within a social network (a kind of facebook with the contaminants’ profile of each user).

During the presentation of the proposals, there was also an interesting exchange of ideas and suggestions between the groups. It was Friday evening and dinner time was approaching, so we had to end up the session. Once again, we received a very positive feedback from participants, an extra motivation for us to continue organizing these kind of brainstorming, creative and multidisciplinary co-creation sessions.

This was the first workshop within the Critical Design Cycle about Internal Contamination. We will continue working on these proposals on the 5th of April (Friday), 19:30 at the Mandarina Space (as always, we will create a registration form on Evenbrite). Remember that these sessions are free and open to all of you willing to participate. And not just for those that came to the previous sessions, but to anyone interested and eager to share their ideas in a co-creative way.

We will keep you informed!

Remember that you can check the summaries of the past sessions of the cycle in our blog and the presentations’ videos in our Youtube channel.

You can also find all the photos of the workshop in our Facebook page.

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2nd Edition TalentLab: 'Co-Creating a scientific exhibition with the public' workshop summary - 2nd Session

Session two – iteration and integration

The next day, participants came full of new ideas and materials to improve what they had started the day before. They had some time to work on their prototypes and then the iterations started. The interchange of ideas between people of the other groups promoted discussion and also constructive inputs for the proposals. At the same time, it was an opportunity to return to the group with new ideas for their own proposals.

Then, they defined their final projects. The first group summarized their ideas as ‘science expresses but humans interpret it and get emotionally affected’, which sought to identify the creative process as emotions, emotions which in turn change the creative process. It would have two areas, one ‘experimental or creative’ where real experiments (crystallization processes and microbiological cultures) would took place, and the other, a multimedia area with video screenings of the experiments and creations to provoke an emotional reaction in the visitors. This should be built by a team of experts (scientists, multimedia technicians, engineers and technical staff), always keeping in mind the pedagogical aspects of the exhibition. They estimated a total cost of 23.000€.

  

The second group summarized their proposal with the message ‘evolution has no direction and no limits’, highlighting the need to know the past to understand the future. They proposed to build a museum that included an exhibition area with an interactive timeline, and an area of interactive games where the topic ‘evolution of technology’ would be explored. To carry it out, a multidisciplinary team would be required (biologists, designers, journalists, director/manager, volunteers) and the total cost would be 500.000€.

The third group entitled their proposal ‘The Limits of Technology’, which aimed to make the visitor reflect on when should technology be stopped. It would be a virtual tour (holography, 3D, Wii) to explore three topics: health, food and energy. The idea would be to pose dilemmas about the relationship between Nature and Technology. Through the virtual tour, the visitors would be encouraged to reflect and make decisions about positive and negative aspects of each topic (moral, historical, hypothesis). The first part would show the historical facts and the second, the current and future dilemmas. To develop the proposal, again a multidisciplinary team would be needed: programmers, designers, journalists, communicators and scientists. On the basis of hiring 20 persons for six months with an average salary of 2.000€/month, the group calculated a budget of 240.000€.

The fourth group proposed a trip trough the ‘natural inspiration in the technological creation’, considering that nature is a source of inspiration to technology. They proposed a tour through an interactive tunnel with three areas: an ‘inspiration’ zone with visual and auditory stimuli (images and sounds from Nature), a ‘discovery’ zone where the visitor would be presented with examples in which nature was used as a template, and a ‘creation’ zone to generate new ideas in a participatory way. These ideas would be projected in a big screen and the visitor would also be able to continue sending suggestions from home. To carry out this proposal one would need a team made of scientists, designers, programmers, graphic designers, and explainers. They estimated a total cost of 200.000€, but with the possibility to adapt the proposal to a less expensive, but still interactive, format.

  

Finally, the fifth group suggested to explore ‘the two faces of technology’ in order to raise public awareness of the benefits and drawbacks of technological progress, and also that the accessibility to technology is a determinant parameter of human quality of life with a strong effect on the opportunities that one can have. They proposed to create a tablet game (or a cardboard one) in which the players would have to create pairs of opposites related with different technological advances, focusing on six key topics. Additionally, with open questions, the participants would be encouraged to share their opinions and ideas about these topics, and stimulate transformation and change. The group did not estimate how it would cost to produce this interactive module, but they underlined the fact that it would be adaptable to a wide range of budgets.

Once all the groups had presented their proposals, we challenged them with a last exercise where they had to integrate all or some of the proposals into a single one, by finding a link between them. The intention was to identify the similarities, complementarities or differences between them. From the different possibilities, the groups suggested to integrate the first and fourth proposals as they highlight the aesthetic and emotional aspects of the creative process. They also mentioned the possibility of merging the second, third and fifth proposals to explore the role of technology in our society in a more complex way: the different faces of technological evolution and the need to define its limits.

  

The workshop was a way to reflect on the complex relationship between technology and nature and their role of society. At the end of the session, it was clear that there are many ways to translate these topics into exhibitions, but it was also clear that there are an obvious interest by the public to participate in the creation of contents. From the proposals generated in this workshop, the idea is now to keep working and exploring the nature-technology duality, with the help of new collaborators, in order to translate the results into a real exhibition.

This activity was also a opportunity to explore some innovative working dynamics that favor participation and interdisciplinarity, but also an opportunity to establish new networks of contacts, or worknetting (first work together, then connect the opposite to the much abused “networking”), as Irene from La Mandarina de Newton said. We hope this workshop will be the beginning of a new line of work for CSIC (Catalonia), open to everyone.

You can find more photos in our facebook page.

For more information you can also check out the website of TalentLab.

—————–
Laura Valls. Unitat de Cultura Científica Delegació del CSIC. 
Irene Lapuente. La Mandarina de Newton S.L.

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2nd Edition TalentLab: 'Co-Creating a scientific exhibition with the public' workshop summary - 1st Session

The fourth and last workshop of TalentLab II (21 and 22 of February, 2013) at the Residència d’Investigadors (CSIC Barcelona). With this workshop we began a new line of work, open to the public, with which we aimed to explore and define the guidelines for a future scientific exhibition inspired on the duality nature-technology. This time, the work process was developed in two sessions and the different groups of participants evolved throughout the two days. The participants were interchanging groups according to the dynamic of the sessions. Therefore, when we refer to a certain group, remember that they are not always formed by the same people.

Session one – inspiration and conception

The first session began with a reflection on the nature-technology duality. Frequently, when we think about ‘nature’ and ‘technology’ we immediately associate them to pre-conceived images or ideas, and we also see them as opposite terms. Is this true? Is it easy to define in crisp, clear terms what is ‘natural’ and what is ‘artificial’? If this is not the case, why are we constantly opposing one against the other? After being prompted with these kind of questions to spark a debate, the participants divided themselves in groups. Getting inspiration from printed images. they discussed about the boundaries between nature and technology.

From these provoking exercise, the first group, inspired by a picture of huge tree roots encroaching the ruins in Angkor Vat (Cambodia), emphasized the idea that ‘in the end nature always imposes itself’. They also mentioned that nature offers us technology that can be mimicked by humans (picture of a beehive). They referred to ship transport as an example of globalization due to the technological advances, and the positive (cargo transport) and negative (transport of invasive species) aspects we all should evaluate. In this sense, they also commented on the role of technology in improving life’s quality, in contrast to its use for war.

The second group mentioned nature as an inspiration to develop sustainable technology. From a picture of a earthquake they raised the idea of ‘re-thinking’ technology from the observation of nature.

co-crear 014    co-crear 013 

The third group remarked that, although globalization have enabled the access to more resources (goods), we have to be careful about the over-exploitation of nature. As an example of the contradictions of the globalized world (and at the same time, of the hybridization of nature and technology) they mentioned the fact that some fruits and vegetables that reach our supermarkets may have been collected more than a year ago and they just maintain their aspect due to anoxic treatments. The group also highlighted that technology should be seen as an ally.

The fourth group said that ‘we are technology’. From an image of a stone, they emphasized that nature is not a static thing, it is in constant change. Contrary to what the first group highlighted, they argued that nature does not have to impose itself, simply because there is no confrontation. They remarked the idea that technological knowledge has no control over everything, over nature, although it is a widespread idea. They also mentioned the need for ‘coexistence’. A picture of a Eduardo Kac’s installation where two girls look at a live microcosmos, suggested to them ‘curiosity’ and ‘control of nature’.

Finally, the fifth group, inspired by the order in a container ship and the disorder of a landfill site, highlighted the opposite ideas of order and chaos. From another image which depicted the use of DDT in the past, the group reinforced the idea that one cannot predict the consequences of the use of technology, reinforcing the point of view of the fourth group, i.e., that one cannot have control over everything. Finally, they also mentioned the topic of patents. They questioned if it is right to consider nature as an ‘invention’ and therefore, to grant exploitation rights to the companies so that they can manage natural resources, such as water.

From all these ideas, participants then wrote down in post-its the ideas they considered most relevant and hung them on panels. The next step was to, altogether, reorganize the ideas into topic groups. The participants ended up with six groups: inclusion-exclusion of technological knowledge, food, limits, evolution, natural models, and creation and emotion. Then, each participant chose one of these topics and from this self-selection, new working groups were created. In order to maintain five groups, the topic ‘food’ was incorporated in the ‘inclusion-exclusion’ one.

In order to start narrowing these general ideas, we used a creative method called ‘brainwriting’, in which everyone works for everyone. First, each participant wrote down three specific actions for each of the topics, in a complete and concise sentence. The worksheets were passed through all the members of each group and this activity generated 250 proposals. Then, individually, everyone voted the ones they found more interesting. For the topic ‘Natural Models’, participants highlighted the proposal of displaying tools and materials inspired by natural morphologies, Gaudi’s art style, natural architecture found in flowers, and industrial products inspired by nature.

For the topic ‘Inclusion-Exclusion of Technology’, participants voted for a proposal which consisted in exhibiting photographies that bring to light this contrast or, alternatively, images that are not what they look like; they also voted for a world map to show where the different technologies are created and where they are used, and also proposed an activity to discuss the topic of the exclusivity of the patents regarding nature and food industry.

For the topic ‘Creation and Emotion’ they chose an activity that would put the visitor in the place of a person with sensory disorders: a fear module where the human reaction to different problems would be put to test, a role-playing game to explore how it would be to live without technology (in order to realize that actually we are surrounded by technology), a soundtrack inspired by nature, the reuse of obsolete technology.

 

For the topic ‘Evolution’ they voted for a representation of the brain in which the different parts would be illuminated to show how evolution took place throughout species, a showcase with the different tools that humans used through evolution, a representation of the mass production of food, to show how objects evolved (feather pen to ball pens, rock to high-tech tablets). Also they proposed to exhibit photographs of the same place throughout the years, and to show one object/invention and how it evolved through the years and in different ethnicities.

For the topic ‘Limits’, the participants chose a proposal to bring the attention of the public towards the ethic problems related with biotechnology, an interactive game to highlight the limits (ethical, technological, etc.) of different topics, a representation of a brain of an elderly person as a symbol of our limits, and an activity to discuss about the exportation of waste by showing a mountain of waste as a way to represent human consumption.

 

From these ideas, the groups had to define and work on a specific proposal. They had some time to clarify ideas and narrow the options. Finally, late in the afternoon, we saw the first 3D prototypes.

You can find more photos in our facebook page.

For more information you can also check out the website of TalentLab.

—————–
Laura Valls. Unitat de Cultura Científica Delegació del CSIC. 
Irene Lapuente. La Mandarina de Newton S.L.

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