And... We have the winners of the 3rd edition of Science of the City!

During the last 3 months we have received several videos from participants of different places, ages and backgrounds. Videos that show us endless ways of seeing the science that surrounds us. This year we awarded two videos, one chosen by the public through online voting and one chosen by a jury of experts in science, technology and audiovisuals. It was not easy, but a decision had to be made…

The winners of this Science of the City’s edition are:

Biological clocks: the rhythm that moves us, by Laia Torres and Laura Pardo.


Accelerate yourself, by Mar Batlle.

The jury wants also to make special mention to the video of John Scott, Glasgow, City of Science. This video offers a novel and interesting view of this Scottish city. If you seek scientific destinations for this summer, we believe that this one is highly recommended.

We would like to congratulate the winners and all of you who took part of this contest, for all the effort! We hope you enjoyed a lot while creating your videos and, of course, that you have learned and discovered a little more about the science of your city!

Keep Looking at your city with scientific eyes and explaining and sharing what you see because science is everywhere!

Remember Science of the City doesn’t end here! Some of the videos you submitted will be aired on TV, we will keep working and organizing activities….

We’ll keep you updated!



Investigating the importance of colors

As you know, we continue working on the project Science of the City #2. Although the first phase of the video contest finished early this year, we are still receiving videos as a result of different collaborations we have established with international institutions, in countries such as Croatia or Netherlands. Moreover, we began with the second phase of the project, in which we aim to establish a bridge between participants and scientists.

On Friday April 5, we were at the Institut Lluís de Requesens, Molins de Rei, Barcelona, holding a workshop for students and researchers. The students from this school participated in the 2nd edition of Science of the City video contest with several videos: ‘Temperature Changes‘, ‘A Flood of Signals‘, ‘Public Services at Molins‘ and ‘Boredom at the Institute‘. The lattest was one of the winners of this edition, in which the students questioned the importance of building design in schools, particularly of the colors used in classrooms and corridors, and how this influences the attention span of the students during the classes. This seemed to us an extremely interesting question and thus, with the help of the Atelier des Jours à Venir, we tried to contact experts on perception and cognition.

Two researchers from the Donders Institute (Nilmegen, Netherlands), Dr. Guillaume Sescousse (Cognitive Control- Perception, Action and Control) and Dra. Mathilde Bonnefond (Neuronal Oscillations- Brain Networks and Neuronal Communication) accepted our invitation and came to Molins de Rei to join the workshop.

In this first session we wanted to, in one hand, create a link between the students and the researchers and, on the other hand, find ways to translate the scientific concepts of the winning video to questions that could be interesting for our invited researchers to follow up at their labs. For that we conducted several activities focused on the topics of learning, attention, color,…

We began with a first exercise in order to ‘break the ice’ within the room: we arranged ourselves according to the color of our eyes, from the lightest to the ones darkest. Then, we asked the students to, in post-its of different colors, write down whatever these colors remind them of: peace, joy, euphoria,… Then, the task was to sort the post-its by topics. Once re-ordered, we could conclude that unconsciously we associate different colors with specific issues or feelings.

The students explained what had motivated them to make the video, and the scientists, their research projects

The students hypothesized that the boring environment of the corridors and classrooms of their school could be one of the reasons for the lack of interest and attention during classes. The neuroscientist Guillaume Sescousse explained how he and his team study the reward processing and risky decision-making, in both healthy and psychiatric disorders’ conditions. Dra. Mathilde Bonnefond explained that part of her work in the lab focus on trying to understand how our brain processes the information and how the different brain regions communicate with each other during the different cognitive processes, such as during visual processing under various levels of attention. To illustrate how the colors can interfere with the learning processes and with our ability to maintain our focus levels, the researchers challenged the students with different exercises. One of them was to try to memorize the maximum number of words during 2 minutes. Each set of words was presented in different background colors: red, blue and gray. At the end of the game, we all could confirm that, as shown in scientific studies, the colors influence our memory and focus capabilities. The red creates tension and make us more focused, opposite to blue, which relaxes us. We usually associate blue colors with creative environments, however, this means a reduced ability to retain information.

At the end of the workshop, we asked the students to re-think the questions and ideas raised in the winning video. We wanted to finish the session with a narrow set of questions on the topic. Here are some of the issues raised: Do colors equally affect people of different ages? Does the way we perceive colors depend on the time of the day or season? Does color affects differently people of different cultures? What colors should be chosen for the different school spaces? What happens in the brain during color perception?

Now, of all the questions and issues raised during this morning, students have to choose one, the one they would like to explore with the help of the researchers. The next workshop is already scheduled: on July we all meet again! We will keep you informed!


Announcing the winners of Science of the City II!

This second edition of Science of the City will have different phases. It will travel around different cities of the world where it will incorporate new videos, new ideas and new debates.

So far, the first phase of this second edition ended on December 15th. It got a high level participation. The members of the jury have been Irene Lapuente, Ramon Sangüesa, Albert Folk, Claire Ribrault and Livio Riboli-Sasco. They had a hard job choosing for the best videos. Finally, they decided to hand the prizes to these three following videos:

La basura en la ciudad (150€)

Avorriment a l’Institut (150€)
Biogas (150€)

We would like to congratulate the winners and all the rest of the participants for their effort and their learning experienced!

The following steps will lead us to connect the participants with science researchers in the following fields: waste, perception and energy. We will keep you informed!


Ready to vote for the first videos of Science of the City II

The first phase of the Science of the City #2 video contest is already completed.

This time the issues that concerned the participants were energy, waste and colors! Could we get students more interested in what they learn if schools had other colors painted on the walls? How colors in traffic signals affect people? Why recycling bins are yellow and blue, two colors that color-blind people cannot tell apart? Can we create energy from people treading on the streets? And with biogas? And turbines? Can we save energy with more public transportation? And by decreasing thermal contracts? What do we do with our garbage?… These are some of the questions and proposals sent to us.

If you want to vote for them, visit

In late January 2013, Science of the City will travel to Croatia… The deadline for creating videos in this new phase is not over yet! We’ll keep you informed!


Opens Science of the City II Video Contest!

La Mandarina de Newton, within its area of research and work Co-Creating Cultures, and after the success of the first edition, launches the second edition of Science of the City.

Science of the City takes places in Barcelona, Silicon Valley, Paris and other cities. La Mandarina de Newton appreciates the support of the Tech Museum of San Jose in Silicon Valley, California, of the entire membership of its virtual platform. Also the support of the Paris-Montagne NGO and the Municipality of Barcelona.

Science of the City promotes dialogue between city and science

Scientists and technologists do research and create solutions that affect us in our daily lives. How can we let them know what we know and what concerns us about the problems in our streets, squares and neighborhoods? How can we learn and work together to improve our daily life in our cities?

Through the Science of the City project we create a bridge for anyone to reach and meet with scientists and technologists, and to know the why of the thousand and one possibilities and realities that science and technology create for our cities.

If you want to participate in the process, start by entering the video contest and send a two-minute video that can be:

  • a question: make a video about a question that intrigues you and that involves some science or technology aspect.

For example, “How is traffic handled in a city?.” If you win the contest, we will help you spend time with a research group that can answer your question.

  • a proposal: Imagine and describe a solution that incorporates science and technology. We will look for a research group that can evaluate your proposal and you will be able to see how they work on it and how it evolves.

For example, in the first edition of Science of the City a participant suggested using the street noises to create power in cities: Can you think of a proposal to solve other problems in the city?

From now until December 7th you will be able to send us as many videos as you want and we will upload them at this platform. Chose an idea, make a 2 minutes video, upload it at your Youtube acount and send us (cocreatingcultures (@) a short description and the link. We will upload them at the platform of the project:

During this time you can also watch the videos of other participants, comment on them, ask other people in the platform for advice on your own videos and, finally, vote on the proposals.

Remember, the deadline ends on December 7th, 2012.

The best videos submitted to the contests will be selected by a jury and by popular vote. All videos will be part of a research project open to scientists and technologists.

This year three prizes will be awarded:

  • Most original question
  • More surprising proposal
  • Most voted Video

If you look carefully around you, you will be surprised with the number of scientific phenomena that can be observed without leaving your city. If, however, you still have doubts about how they could be shown on your clips,you can have a look at the two samples we have prepared. We hope they you like them and they can inspire you!


Ready, set, vote!

The deadline for submitting videos (except in French which has a separate deadline, July 19) for  the  Science of the City video contest finished last week. From now on, you can start voting via the platform, which eventually will host the virtual exhibition of Science of the City. Remember that you can only vote once because the system recognizes the IP.

We are looking for the video you like the most because of its clarity, originality and format. The voting period will be open until July 14th, 2011. The chosen video will get a prize of $ 150.

A jury of five people: Irene Lapuente, Ramon Sanguesa and Albert Folk, members of Co-Creating Cultures, Patricia Homs, a member of the science area at ​​Arts Santa Mònica and Bob Ketner, the manager of the Tech Virtual at the Tech Museum, will choose the videos that will be awarded for: the best video (600$), the best video in English (300$), the best video in Spanish (300$), the best finding (150$), the best question (150$) and the best experiment (150$).

The awards will be public on July 15th 2011 in this blog.

Thank you for your collaboration, we look forward to your vote and  we wish good luck to all participants!


The “Science of the City” video contest starts today!!

Today officially starts the “Science of the City Video Contest“.  You can find more information at The Tech Virtual new website.

Look at your city with a different perspective. This time, instead  of searching for shops, streets and restaurants, look for scientific finding: snails, fossils, LED, chemical reactions, etc.  Think about a scientific experiment and test it in your city: Newton’s laws, fluids laws, chemistry laws… Or make yourself a question! These are the three categories of this video contest:

Once you have chosen a topic, you can make observations, wonder, get information, run an experiment, use your imagination or ask us. Finally, you can create a 2 minutes video and upload it to “Science of the City“. You can win one of the 7 prizes offered!

We will build an exhibition with the better and most voted videos and with the tags you use.  Do not hesitate and enjoy the experience of creating a different, freak, creative, imaginative, funny video. You can be part of a collective scientific exhibition!

The contest starts now and it will last three months. We will announce regular meetings to co-create the most scientific and original videos ever seen!!

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